Yearly Archives: 2015


The Crime Museum Uncovered

The opening of the new Museum of London exhibition every October is one of the high points of my year as they always have amazingly imaginative displays that showcase different aspects of the capital’s rich and varied history and culture. There’s not many things that I would willingly roll out of bed for at 3am on my birthday but this is definitely one of them! Last year’s exhibition took a close look at the city’s most famous fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, bringing to life the world that Conan Doyle’s most celebrated creation inhabited. This year, however, although the focus remains […]


The Crucible, Bristol Old Vic

Although it was no doubt the bane of many other students’ lives, I remember absolutely loving Arthur Miller’s The Crucible as a teenager and read my copy several times over. Actually, as an aside, when I recently moved house and had to pack and then unpack all of my books again, I was a bit mortified to notice how low brow my more recent reading material seems in comparison to the sort of thing that I was reading as a young adolescent when I was devouring the likes of Ulysses, The Crucible, War and Peace and even several Balzac novels […]


Clarence House

Exterior of Clarence House. Photographer Mark Fiennes I am WAY behind with EVERYTHING right now due to health woes, moving house and birthdays chez nous! I’m going to try and get on top of things a bit more from now on though as I have a massive backlog of posts to write and all manner of cool and interesting things to share with you all. Those of you with long memories may well recall that I paid a rather splendid visit to Buckingham Palace not that long ago where I was permitted to take photographs of the state rooms – […]


The Lost Life of Eva Braun

A depressingly long time ago, as a fresh faced young undergraduate at the University of Nottingham, I signed up to a module devoted to art in Nazi Germany, which was taught by Dr Fintan Cullen. Fintan and I never really got along all that well (this is a massive understatement – we absolutely loathed each other) but he was, I have to admit, a really impressive and rather floridly verbose teacher who really came into his element when dealing with the robust imagery and political ramifications of Nazi era art. At the time, WWII had ended just fifty years earlier […]


The Scandalous Lady W

I remember thoroughly enjoying Hallie Rubenhold’s brilliant The Scandalous Lady W (originally published in the UK as Lady Worsley’s Whim) when I read it several years ago and so was absolutely thrilled when I heard that not only was it going to be dramatised for television but it would also be starring the excellent Natalie Dormer as the eponymous Seymour Fleming, Lady Worsley, who caused a furore in the eighteenth century when she eloped with one of her lovers, prompting her husband, who according to the mores of the day considered his wife to be his property, to sue the […]


Marianne and France

One of my definite highlights from last year was finally seeing inside Windsor Castle – however, although I very much enjoyed poking around the gloriously opulent state rooms, my favourite bit was having a good old look at Queen Mary’s Dolls House, which is on permanent display in the castle and is a beautiful masterpiece of miniature art. However, rather ignored by the castle’s visitors, there are two other examples of amazing miniature art close by in the metre high persons of pretty blonde France and charming brunette Marianne, the two lovely dolls presented by the children of France to […]