georgians


The Life and Times of Fanny Hill

In a week where everyone is talking about the release of the Fifty Shades of Grey film (did anyone actually like that book? I haven’t read any of them and have no plans to do so or to see the film but it seems to have inspired unmitigated loathing everywhere. SOMEONE must have liked it though, surely?), it seemed oddly fitting to make a trip to the beautiful Old Vic theatre in Bristol to watch April de Angelis’ play about its shocking eighteenth century forerunner, Fanny Hill, a book that scandalised and titillated Georgian society after its release in 1748. […]


Being Georgian at Kew Palace

This has been an amazing year for the Historic Royal Palaces thanks to the amazing events they have had going on to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Hanoverian succession to the British throne upon the death of Queen Anne in 1714. I’ve been really privileged to visit the palaces during this time and even take some behind the scenes peeks at the installations as well as enjoy a Georgian themed sleepover at Hampton Court Palace. It’s been brilliant. However, up until last weekend, I had somehow managed to miss seeing Kew Palace, which was such an important and integral […]


Lover’s Eye Jewellery at Tatty Devine

Eye miniatures, early nineteenth century. Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum. As we all know, the eighteenth century was a bit of a heyday for weird, wonderful and often super creepy fashion from the amazingly funereal get ups of the Merveilleuses with their white powdered faces, red ribbon chokers (to evoke their guillotined chums) to false eyebrows made from mouse hair to having entire miniature gardens decorating the tops of their towering white coiffures. However, to my mind, the creepiest eighteenth century fashion of all time has got to be the brief fashion towards the end of the century for eye […]


The Glorious Georges at Kensington Palace

‘In 1727, King George II succeeded to the British throne: a German born, military man with a penchant for punctuality and a glamorous succession of mistresses. He and his wife, Queen Caroline – a witty, intellectually curious and highly educated woman – cultivated a sparkling court at Kensington Palace, which became the talk of Georgian London. George and Caroline used the splendid State Apartments at Kensington Palace to entertain and host dazzling parties to which the great and good flocked, eager to catch a glimpse of the royal family, the great ‘celebrities’ of the age. This Easter, Historic Royal Palaces […]


The Glorious Georges at Hampton Court Palace

‘In 1714, King George I arrived in London: an obscure German prince who spoke little English, spectacularly elevated to the British throne. Selected by the British parliament as a Protestant with an illustrious royal lineage, after the successive childlessness of the Stuart monarchs, here was a King who came with a ready-made Prince of Wales in tow. Yet, in a spectacular irony of history, after having waited so long for legitimate male heirs, the new Hanoverian dynasty would present Britain with the opposite problem: almost constant warfare between the monarch and the heir for the next fifty years! This year […]


The First Georgians: Art and Monarchy 1714-1760

A Musical Tea Party, Laroon, 1740. Photo: Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014. In 1714 George I ascended the throne as the first British monarch of the German House of Hanover. With the dawn of a new dynastic age came a silent revolution – one of the most dramatic periods of change across all aspects of British political, intellectual and cultural life. To mark the 300th anniversary of the beginning of the Georgian era, The First Georgians: Art and Monarchy 1714-1760 explores royal patronage and taste in the reigns of George I and George II as a product of […]